When and Why to use Home Health Care?

 

 

If you're like the majority of seniors, you probably want to live at home for as long as possible. You like your feeling of independence. The thought of paying for an assisted living facility makes your heart flutter.

 

 

But there are some activities of daily living (ADLs) like dressing, bathing driving or grocery shopping that can become difficult for some seniors.

 

 

In-home care provides seniors with home health care, non-medical care and even companionship. You keep your independence and your house. In-home care professionals come to you.

 

 

Why In-Home Care?

One survey shows that 90% of seniors want to stay in their homes as long as possible. Your home is where you're comfortable. It's what is familiar. It provides comfort. If you move out to an assisted living community or nursing home, you're starting over. You may have to room with a stranger.

 

 

With in-home care, you're able to remain as independent as you can be. Independence is a psychological boon, especially when the effects of aging are taking place.

 

 

For example, you have hip replacement surgery. And instead of heading to a nursing home for care, you go back home, where a physical therapist helps your recovery. And a home health aide tends to your home until you can. The surroundings are yours. You sleep in your bed. All of this familiarity can help with your recovery.

 

 

One study found that those who received in-home care visited the doctor 25% fewer times than those that didn't receive in-home care. Clients with Alzheimer's or other dementia diseases, made almost 50% less trips to the doctor.

 

 

Types of In-Home Care

Not all in-home care is the same. There is service for any kind of need. For example, a man shows signs of Alzheimer's but is otherwise physically healthy. He may just need help with paying his bills, getting to appointments, etc. He won't necessarily need medical help yet.

 

 

Licensed medical professionals can include physicians, physician's assistants (PA), nurses, physical and occupational therapists, and some specialty home health aides who work under the direction of a physician.

 

 

Non-medical paraprofessionals include as home health aides, personal care attendants, homemakers and companions. Home health aides provide hands-on care and assistance to with ADLs. They can also help with cooking, shopping and laundry.

 

 

Homemakers or companions provide services such as light housekeeping, transportation, and companionship. These activities are known as instrumental ADLs. People with Alzheimer's will often use a companion to assist them.

 

 

Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)

 

 


  • Bathing

  • Dressing

  • Feeding

  • Toileting

  • Grooming

  • Oral Care

  • Walking or using a wheelchair

  •  

Instrumental ADLs

 

 



     
  • Housekeeping

  • Laundry

  • Change linens

  • General shopping    

  • Transportation

  • Meal Preparations

  • Managing money

  • Medication management


  •